St. Michael Academy welcomes new teachers

PETOSKEY — A trio of recent instructors lately started the faculty 12 months at St. Michael Academy in Petoskey.

Jennifer Eustice

Jennifer Eustice lives in Petoskey and can be coaching biology, chemistry, and artwork.

Eustice has 12 years of coaching experience and formerly taught at Concord Academy Petoskey, the Michigan Virtual Charter Academy and in other long-term positions around Petoskey.

Eustice said she likes to educate because “I love getting to know

teachers

 

 

every day” and her favorite teaching interest is “arms-on sports and the instant where college students have the know-how of ideas.”every day” and her favorite teaching interest is “arms-on sports and the instant where college students have the know-how of ideas.”

Eustice introduced she is looking forward to “the small class size and opportunity to share my interests with the pupil and households wherein I stay.”

Andrew Moe

Andrew Moe lives in Petoskey and could be teaching Theology II, III and IV and Latin II.

This is Moe’s first year of full-time coaching. He formerly becomes a replacement instructor at St. Michael Academy

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“I want to proportion things which might be accurate,” Moe said. “I find nothing greater properly than the fact approximately Jesus and his Church. Latin is enjoyable, however, is in particular useful in its potential to educate us a way to assume and examine.”

Moe stated his favored teaching activity is taking questions from students.

“When a student wants something clarified I recognize they’re engaged,” he stated. “Sometimes it even manner they want to recognize extra about what I’m trying to educate.”

Moe introduced he is calling forward to “seeing students revel in the subjects I teach as lifestyles-converting fact instead of simply ‘things I ought to learn how to graduate.’”

Kurt Grangood

Kurt Grangood, 46, lives in Petoskey and could be coaching English and social research.

Grangood has 21 years of coaching revel in

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“I experience challenging every pupil, to move beyond what they recognize, offering new mind or increasing earlier know-how,” he stated.

Grangood brought his favored teaching interest is “the activity that gives connection.”

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

In the preface to One Hundred and One Famous Poems, published in 1929, editor Roy W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age

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While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen.

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

 

It’s easy to get caught up in our own stories without understanding them.

Academy

 

Howard-Johnson peppers her poetry with images of travel, not just global but time travel. She remarks in “Poetry, Quantum Mechanics, and Other Trifles” that her critique group warns her she complicates her poems with too many layers:

“my ingredients, they say, are concealed
behind an opaque pottery bowl;
their matrices misunderstood.
Children we are. No one tells
us the truth of such a grand
dessert.”

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke pointed out the truths of existence in Sonnets to Orpheus, showing us that a young ballet dancer, dead, is not forever gone, but is not visible to us. That’s “the truth of such a grand/dessert.” That’s what poetry is about–revealing, evoking, describing, thought-provoking. Poetry connects the past with the present and future. Howard-Johnson can visit the historic, the war museum in Oslo, and reflect on war as it affected the world:

“Norway’s fjords shed salty droplets on
faces like my father’s. Round faces. Eyes dilute-blue
like the pale skies above them. Men who fought

as Churchill’s Michael  voice crackled  Academy through smuggled  teachers vacuum
tubes.”

Howard-Johnson considers war as it now affects her family:

“Only days before
I reached this spur, I saw my grandson off to war, alone.
A sacrifice. A trade. For my father, who never marched.”

We feel the sense of place in poetry, but the place is fluid, as in Howard-

Michael

 

Johnson’s work–a flight from LAX to Salt Lake City can take her through her own childhood home where her mother washed a slip every night. The unities of time and place in good drama or in a short story can be tweaked in poetry–although often the poet, like a painter, wants to concentrate attention on one time, one place, one concept. Good poetry can tell a story or capture a mood both ways.

Dr. James Ragan, the director of the University of Southern California Master of Professional Writing Program where I graduated in 1999, says in an interview quoted on the Master of Professional Writing Web site:

“You want to challenge yourself. Ask yourself, is my time here going to have the meaning I need for it to have? Poetry has given me that meaning. But then I had to write on the level that allowed me to cross borders as well as time, and that’s the challenge of creation

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Ragan, like Howard-Johnson, strives for universal themes. The personal and the universal are not mutually exclusive. A poem may be peppered with personal details, but may capture a common history (World War II), the need for tolerance (a favorite theme in Howard-Johnson’s work), aging, the fear that a poet has started too late in life, which Howard-Johnson captures in “A Reel Left Running”:

“Now age obscures images, pulled taffy,
whisked meringue, they melt, struggle to be named.

.”

 

 

Biloxi police officer featured in Glamour Magazine’s

A Biloxi police officer was selected to represent Mississippi in a Glamour Magazine’s titled “50 States of Women”, a poll of over 2,000 American women approximately self-esteem and their hopes for the destiny.

Officer Ashleigh Pack is committed to overcoming all obstacles

Magazine’s

 

get in the way of her success, on and stale duty.

Pack’s dedication to her work with the Biloxi Police Department granted her the possibility to be highlighted Glamour’s September 2017 trouble. When it comes to facing adversity, she instructed Glamour, “I accept as true with bad reports mildew us into the human beings were intended to be.”

Below is the entire essay that  Magazine’s  Pack submitted to featured  be considered for the function, police  in which she discusses her accomplishments as a police officer and the importance of being chronic.

At the age of 14, I have become inquisitive about crook justice and law enforcement. I instructed my mom one day while watching Law and Order Special Victim’s Unit that I became going to be “Olivia” after I grew up. I by no means ventured some distance from that intention. In 2004 I graduated High School after which College in 2008 with a Bachelor’s diploma in Criminal Justice. In 2010 I graduated the Harrison County Police Academy. I changed into the handiest girl in my elegance. Throughout the academy, I was required to perform the equal mentally and bodily as all of the men. I turned into in no way as soon as handled in another way with the aid of the instructors or other cadets. After commencement, I began my career in law enforcement and worked hard to come to be a well-rounded and educated officer. I actually have labored on patrol day and night shift, with narcotics venture forces, with a gang prevention undertaking pressure, and in a criminal investigation, department focusing on sexual attacks. The regulation enforcement profession remains a male dominate career and as a lady, I have had to work greater hard in some factors to get in which I am. It is unusual for a person, male or girl, to have had the opportunities to perform and skilled the

Throughout the academy, I was required to perform the equal mentally and

police

bodily as all of the men. I turned into in no way as soon as handled in another way with the aid of the instructors or other cadets. After commencement, I began my career in law enforcement and worked hard to come to be a well-rounded and educated officer. I actually have labored on patrol day and night shift, with narcotics venture forces, with a gang prevention undertaking pressure, and in a criminal investigation, department focusing on sexual attacks. The regulation enforcement profession remains a male dominate career and as a lady, I have had to work greater hard in some factors to get in which I am. It is unusual for a person, male or girl, to have had the opportunities to perform and skilled the multi-faceted factors of regulation enforcement which have been supplied to me thru my difficult work and staying power

w magazine instagram

w magazine address

Throughout the academy, I was required to perform the equal mentally and bodily as all of the men. I turned into in no way as soon as handled in another way with the aid of the instructors or other cadets. After commencement, I began my career in law enforcement and worked hard to come to be a well-rounded and educated officer. I actually have labored on patrol day and night shift, with narcotics venture forces, with a gang prevention undertaking pressure, and in a criminal investigation, department focusing on sexual attacks. The regulation enforcement profession remains a male dominate career and as a lady, I have had to work greater hard in some factors to get in which I am. It is unusual for a person, male or girl, to have had the opportunities to perform and skilled the multi-faceted factors of regulation enforcement which have been supplied to me thru my difficult work and staying power.

I pondered the question “What do I believe in” before figuring out how to solve. The query is vague and is most possibly intended to be; however, even as there are numerous ideas I consider in, all of them appear to be centered on two that cross hand in hand: hard paintings and patience. Hard work and endurance are the premises to living the life you want to live. In this u. S . There is not anything you can’t-do if you are willing to paintings difficult and are chronic for your desires and desires. So many human beings nowadays use terrible life experiences as crutches or excuses no longer to work difficult and pursue their goals. So many people count on things to receive to them as opposed to setting the attempt forth to gain the one’s goals.

w magazine masthead

 I wish extra human beings could comprehend bad experiences in life, a few worse than others, are important to mold us into the human beings were meant to be. If human beings in preferred could have a touch more staying power of their goals and be inclined to work tough to accomplish them, there might be not anything we couldn’t do in this country and on this global.

I had been blessed to be born and live in a rustic where there are infinite

featured

 

 

possibilities. The media will inform you in any other case, however, the fact is in America it doesn’t be counted your race, your faith, your economic popularity, or your gender, you’ve got the possibility to end up whoever you want to be. I am now not announcing that it will be smooth and that it’s going to just be exceeded to you but the possibility is always there in case you are inclined to paintings for it. I am living proof of that as a college graduate of dad and mom with out university degrees and a female in a male-dominated profession. In many other nations, you’re informed what you’ll believe, you’re advised what your profession will be, and whether or not you’re allowed to have a career at all. You are advised how you will stay and the way you may boost your own family. There are few other nations that could have allowed me to visit the college and emerge as a police officer. I have traveled overseas to many other countries and although I loved the enjoy of traveling I haven’t any desire to stay in another USA but America. My America is the possibility.

Featured Showcase Artist: Mile Twelve

The Bluegrass Ramble at IBMA’s World of Bluegrass in Raleigh, NC, offers fanatics with a risk to peer two styles of bands: hooked up businesses with sizable lineup changes or a new sound, and up-and-comers who’re starting to break out into the countrywide traveling and radio scene. One of the thirty bands performing as part of this 12.

One of the thirty bands performing as part of this 12 months’ Ramble

Twelve

 

is Mile Twelve, a young organization based in and around Boston, Massachusetts. They’ve were given a state-of-the-art album set to launch October 27, and that they’re geared up to hit World of Bluegrass for the first time as a complete five-piece band.

Mile Twelve first got here collectively in fall 2014 with 4 founding members. Fiddler Bronwyn Keith-Hynes, banjo participant BB Bowness, and bassist Nate Sabat have been looking for a brand new track venture to end up concerned in, and guitarist Evan Murphy, who changed into additionally interested in joining a brand new institution, had currently moved lower back to his homeland of Boston, near in which the relaxation of the contributors was based. The 4 musicians met up, began operating up authentic material and booking gigs, and a band became born. They brought mandolin participant David Benedict closing fall, and have considering the fact that recorded their first complete-length album and booked excursion dates for the duration of

They brought mandolin participant David Benedict closing fall, and have considering the fact that recorded their first complete-length album and booked excursion dates for the duration of u. S . A . And across the world. In fact, they’ll be journeying New Zealand (domestic of Bowness) and Australia this October.

The new album, Onwards, becomes produced and engineered by Stephen Mougin, who has ended up quite the mentor to younger bands in recent years. The album’s twelve tracks encompass ten originals, with contributions from every band member. “Mile Twelve is devoted to developing and arranging cloth that is authentic to us, and that honors the culture of bluegrass at the same time – not an easy project,” says Keith-Hynes. “We don’t need to rewrite the e-book on bluegrass, we just want to add our small bankruptcy to it. Creating songs which might be real, meaningful, and authentic to us is our pinnacle precedence. That’s what the bluegrass pioneers have been doing.”

Mile Twelve won’t be writing any cabin or mama-in-heaven songs just like the bluegrass pioneers, however, their songs are certainly inspired by way of their own existence stories. Murphy’s Call My Soul, for instance, is about growing up Catholic in Boston. Other songs pay homage to life at the New England coast and within the big city. The track on Onwards, and the band’s music in

Other songs pay homage to life at the New England coast and within the big city. The track on Onwards and the band’s music in trendy may have a conventional bent, even though they discover suggestion everywhere from Celtic tunes to the Punch Brothers to Alan Jackson.

The group is worked up to spend the week in Raleigh and the individuals are searching ahead to each the selecting and the networking possibilities. As show off artists, they’re hoping to meet occasion manufacturers, especially from gala’s, and veteran musicians to function mentors or who are probably searching out an opening act. They additionally hope to find a wider audience for their track and of

They additionally hope to find a wider audience for their track and of the route, earn new fanatics in the procedure. In addition to their showcases, the group plans to wait for the business conference and spend lots of time jamming and networking after hours. “WOB is the location to satisfy and choose with the exceptional bluegrassers on earth,” says Keith-Hynes. “You can locate your self in a jam consultation with one of your heroes!”

Fans and interested listeners can trap Mile Twelve both on the Bluegrass

Showcase

 

 

Ramble and at other diverse showcases at some point of the week. They’ll be on the Architect Bar and inside the Marriott’s Charm City Bluegrass Suite Tuesday night, acting in the convention middle, inside the Boston Bluegrass Room at the Marriott, and on the FloydFest Showcase on Wednesday, and once more in the Boston Bluegrass Room Thursday. The band is likewise a featured performer at Wednesday morning’s Momentum Awards Luncheon. Even even though their new album isn’t set to pop out until the subsequent month, test their report table – they’re certain to have a few increase copies!

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

In the preface to One Hundred and Featured  One Famous Poems, Twelve published in 1929, editor Roy Showcase  W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age.

While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more

Featured

 

accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen.

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

 

I planned a stress-free bachelorette

MANILA—President Rodrigo Duterte made a piece of a cameo appearance

free

 

A cartoon version of the Philippine chief govt turned into featured in an episode titled “Mueller Meets Trump,” launched Thursday.
In the episode of the hit American TV collection, a framed picture of US President Donald Trump and Duterte posing inside the traditional ASEAN Summit handshake may be seen hanging at the wall presumably in one among Trump’s rooms.
The cartoon was stimulated via the awkward handshake among the 2 leaders remaining month.

In a combination photograph, U.S. President Donald Trump registers his marvel as he realizes other leaders, such as Vietnam’s Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc and President of the Philippines Rodrigo Duterte, are crossing their fingers for the conventional “ASEAN handshake” as he participates inside the beginning rite of the ASEAN Summit in Manila, Philippines November thirteen,

Planning your Bachelorette Party Games well in advance of the Event is always a good idea. Some games take a while to get ready – so the sooner you plan, the better! You’ll need to remember that not everyone on the Bachelorette Party will want to play loud/drinking games, so a game like “Candy Eating Necklace” is perfect as it gives the quieter people in the group a chance to get involved, without feeling uncomfortable.

Everyone loves eating candy, and you can make a fun Party Game out of eating candy necklaces that you had when you were a child. This game will stretch your neck and your nostalgia as you have fun eating candy off each other’s necks!

Preparation

Buy everyone coming to the Bachelorette Party a candy necklace. You’ll also want some damp towels so that everyone can wipe off the candy that they are sure to get all over their necks. Make sure you’ve got a hover handy if you’re playing this game at home – as it can sometimes get messy free live stream nfc championship.

How to Play

  • Split everyone into two teams and then have each person put a candy necklace around their neck.
  • Everyone has to put their hands behind their back and keep them there for the whole game.
  • At the same time, have everyone try to eat all the candy off of the necks of everyone on their team. Remember that you can’t use your hands at all in the game, just your mouth. The first team to finish is the winner!
  • This game can also be done by having everyone work with just a single partner rather than a whole team.

Yet another idea for this game is to challenge total strangers to the game if you’re out and about for your Bachelorette Party. You can be sure that will make a lasting impression on everyone at your Bachelorette Party and on the people you meet as well!

Why Master Planned Communities?

bachelorette

 

According to predictions, there will be changes around the globe in the future that will challenge the way people live. These changes include:

  • Much higher gasoline prices
  • Greater emphasis on energy efficiency
  • Environmental protection and other green features
  • Growing water shortages
  • A 24-7 world that will demand amenities that are open 24-7

To be able to keep up with the global changes, innovations are needed, especially in the real estate industry. Understanding the future requires understanding the demographics and how they influenced the market. Thus the birth of the Master Planned Community live football streaming free no download.

What Is A Master Planned Community?

A Master Planned Community (MPC) is a large-scale self-sustaining residential plan. It has a number of various essential amenities not normally found in a regular housing subdivision. A Master Planned Community gives the ability to work, live and play all within walking distance. Some real estate professionals consider this type of luxury real estate development a “Mixed Use” development since they include retail, housing, and entertainment In previous times, clubhouses and pools were at the top of home buyers’ lists. Today, access to neighborhood retail services, high-quality restaurants, and health care is becoming the top priority according to the latest research. People want to get access to everything they need quickly and at reasonable prices, thus walkable access to civic use areas is in high demand.

Convenience

Master Planned Communities are designed to provide a master-planned convenience. In its varied housing within a community layout, homes are designed to conform to the lifestyle of diverse generations. They are created to provide both soft and hard amenities and services in the way people want them delivered. These luxury communities facilitate residents building and living comfortable lives and having more time to spend with their families. This lifestyle also enhances connectivity between neighbors and their surroundings through shared spaces created for everyone across varied demographics to use whether alone or together.

Important Aspects of Master Planned Communities

To highlight the benefits and most significant aspects of Master Planned Communities, listed below are some of the reasons why it is important to the home buyer.

1. Better Access to Important Resource

planned

 

As mentioned above, people nowadays want to have easy and quick access from their own homes to their most important resources. In regular housing subdivisions, however, people bought all lands and built huge properties to maximize their lots, leaving no space for other amenities. In Master Planned Communities, lots and houses are planned accordingly by providing a required minimum and maximum size. That ensures that there are more open spaces for the building of other amenities. For example, park and play spaces are already built within the community and cannot be removed or replaced by any other infrastructures. In Master Planned Communities, virtually everything a resident needs is within the community or within short distances. This kind of setting is not just good for working parents, young professionals, aspiring entrepreneurs, and retiring baby boomers, it is also great for children going in and out of school most of all.

2. A Sense of Community bachelorette Among Residents free  planned

Playspaces, fitness boot camps, sand entry beaches, and co-work spaces are a few additional amenities to present in Master Planned Communities. Health and wellness is also one thing that MPCs are giving special attention to as more and more people are wanting to become healthier. The great outdoors with fresh, local produce and fantastic health care are things they are incorporating into the community in addition to sidewalks, pedestrian ways, multi-use trails, and social gathering places. On top of it all, Master Planned Communities have the long-term increase in value which leads to great Return On Investment for homeowners if planning to sell or rent their property. Master Planned Communities are also great for entrepreneurs. Business opportunities tend to be in abundance as many new partnership opportunities with companies that offer products and services wanted by the new generation of consumers emerge. For aspiring business owners, office spaces tend to be nearby at reasonable prices. The workers of businesses within planned communities tend to earn higher than average incomes. Many residential buyers look for the best location, easy access, quality neighbors, important amenities, and valuable future developments in choosing a home. A Master Planned Community is the realization of what was once just a dream community for many.

AFP journalist Kate Webb featured on Australian stamp

A crusading Agence France-Presse correspondent who enjoyed a storied profession masking wars and different ancient activities has been honored on an Australian stamp.

Kate Webb, who died in 2007 at the age of sixty-four, earned a recognition as a fearless reporter during the Vietnam War and overlaying different momentous testimonies in Asia throughout a profession spanning 4 a long time.

She has featured on one in all 5 new stamps unveiled Wednesday

Australian

 

to mark Remembrance Day on November eleven, while a minute’s silence is held to honor those who have fought and died for his or her united states of America. The stamps might be issued on October 6.

“This stamp problem, the fourth in a series commemorating a century considering the fact that World War I, acknowledges the critical roles women have played in conflict and conflict,” said Michael Zsolt of Australia Post.

Webb, who was born in New Zealand but moved to Australia with her own family as a baby, is shown on a stamp marking the Korea and Vietnam wars, together with Red Cross employee Rosemary Griggs.

In 1971 while masking the Vietnam War, Webb turned into reported killed after she was ambushed and taken prisoner by way of North Vietnamese troops in Cambodia, who marched her and 5 others via the jungle in a 23-day ordeal.

A the front-web page obituary was published the New York Times and the body of another lady wrongly recognized as hers — but simply as her own family held a memorial carrier for her in Sydney, Webb and the opposite captives were freed

tickets for australian open 2016

World War I, World War II, the conflicts in Afghanistan and Iraq, and Australia’s position in peacekeeping operations also function within the stamp series.

Prior to and inclusive of World War I, the involvement of Australian girls in warfare zones become nearly entirely constrained to nursing.

By the Vietnam War, they held many jobs, along with as contributors of civilian clinical groups, Red Cross help, entertainers, and reporters. Today, girls are employed all through the military.

AFP in 2008 launched the once a year Kate Webb Prize to realize great Asian newshounds doing tough and perilous paintings across the location.

The 2017 version is presently welcoming programs, with the winner receiving three,000 euros (about $three,575) in cash if you want to be offered at a prize-giving ceremony.

The contest is open to locally hired Asian photograph, video, and text journalists, for paintings posted at some stage in 2016.

Applications close on November 1

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

In the preface to One Hundred and One Famous Poems, published

stamp

 

 

in 1929, editor Roy W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age.

While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen.

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

Poetry is relevant in today’s text-messaging high-tech world, as evidenced by all the poetry Web sites. It speaks of love, as in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnets. It relates eternal epic truths, as in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. It captures the cry of a generation, as in Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” It reflects, as in Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. It makes a cinematic statement about freedom behind bars, as in the movie “Slam.” It speaks of the Divine, as in the poetry of Thich Nhat Hanh. I agree with Carolyn Howard-Johnson that poetry moves us–or it must if we want to move others. Howard-Johnson’s poetry moved Compulsive Reader editor Magdalena Ball to name Tracings to The Compulsive Reader list of “Top Ten Reads of 2005.”

Howard-Johnson journalist pokes   stamp fun at portraits of Australian  poets on poetry magazines, but clearly, loves poetry:

“So long before you took up a pen, wrote pictures,
you imagined them in liquid blue, the stories of others,
your own.”

It’s easy to get caught up in our own stories without understanding them. Howard-Johnson peppers her poetry with images of travel, not just global but time travel. She remarks in “Poetry, Quantum Mechanics, and Other Trifles” that her critique group warns her she complicates her poems with too many layers:

“my ingredients, they say, are concealed 

journalist

 

 

behind an opaque pottery bowl;
their matrices misunderstood.
Children we are. No one tells
us the truth of such a grand
dessert.”

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke pointed out the truths of existence in Sonnets to Orpheus, showing us that a young ballet dancer, dead, is not forever gone, but is not visible to us. That’s “the truth of such a grand/dessert.” That’s what poetry is about–revealing, evoking, describing, thought-provoking. Poetry connects the past with the present and future. Howard-Johnson can visit the historic, the war museum in Oslo, and reflect on war as it affected the world:

“Norway’s fjords shed salty droplets on
faces like my father’s. Round faces. Eyes dilute-blue
like the pale skies above them. Men who fought

as Churchill’s voice crackled through smuggled vacuum
tubes.”

Howard-Johnson considers war as it now affects her family:

“Only days before
I reached this spur, I saw my grandson off to war, alone.
A sacrifice. A trade. For my father, who never marched.”

 

 

 

 

The Market Featured in ‘Trading Places’ Is in Decline

What might the Duke brothers make of this? Interest in frozen focused orange juice futures is ebbing away, and Florida is guilty.

FCOJ is a small, niche market;

 

a few days, only some hundred futures are offered and bought on ICE Futures U.S. In New York. But it could claim an area inside the famous image that few other components of Wall Street can match, as a result of the famous pit-buying and selling scene near the end of the 1983 movie “Trading Places” in which the Dukes try to nook the marketplace.

The achievement of the Dukes’ fictitious scheme hinges on whether Florida’s orange crop has been damaged. In actual existence, it’s been hammered by way of years of disease. In October through December, facts confirmed Hurricane Irma had inflicted even more woe, helping to pressure production to a seventy-three-year low.

Mirroring that fashion is the slide in open interest or the quantity of superb futures contracts. That’s due to the fact fewer humans need to use futures to hedge the Sunshine State’s shrinking harvest, said Russ Pierson, a booking at Basic Commodities in Winter Park, Florida.

Civilization and culture are two constellations that lie in the same continuum. Each influence and is in turn influenced by the other. Civilization is an advanced state of intellectual, cultural, and material development in human society, marked by progress in the arts and sciences, the extensive use of record-keeping, including writing, and the appearance of complex political and social institutions. This is basically a state of affair in a society at a particular time frame. The definition above suggests the advanced state of affair… in common parlance… but civilization may be traditional or not advanced.

People say Indus valley civilization or Egyptian civilizations which are primitive civilizations. On the other hand, culture means the ways of thinking, acting, behaving that people have internalized in them and which are transformed into reality through their actions in the society. For example, respecting the elders or treating guests as the God; as in “Atithi Devo Bhava” are examples of particular cultural traits. Here before proceeding any further one needs to understand the various constituents of the culture  explorer hernando crossword clue.

When one studies culture,   two things cannot be neglected; cultural traits and cultural complexes. Cultural traits are the individual acts that defy any scientific reason but are simply followed on the basis that they are rooted in tradition. The examples of cultural traits are folding hands in front of a deity or touching the feet of elders. The inter-related cultural traits form a cultural complex.

For example, while performing a “pooja” one lights an “aggravate”, chants some hymns or devotional songs, offers “Prasad” to the lord etc. All these activities constitute the cultural complex. The interplay and interaction of the different cultural complexes form the substratum of culture. With so much of epistemological differences between culture and civilization, one needs to see what separates them both. Culture refers to those intrinsic and intangible elements that engulf human whereas civilization includes all the physical objects that are the exemplification of some objective realities.

Civilization is the human creativity, intellect

Featured

 

and volition translated into reality whereas culture is the morality and intellect that remain as the undercurrent of human thought. Civilization progresses through the vehicle of knowledge and technology whereas culture thrives in the human mind and proceeds through tradition. But when one says they lie in the same continuum means culture determines the civilization. For example, that society where the dominant culture is heroism and hero-worships like the Sioux Indians their substrate of civilization is based on heroism, physical prowess.

Their chief industry is making weapons for hunting and defending own clan members. And their structure of authority and leadership also hovers around this principle only. But at the same time, civilization also influences culture in many ways. The technical developments and objective rationality in knowledge inquire the truth among the traditional customs. Reinterpretation of cultural complexes and superstitions from a scientific point of view makes room for reinterpretation of culture. So culture and civilization influence each other. The present write up requires an analysis if the advancement of civilization makes way for a decline of culture.

As described earlier culture is morality and civilization is the reality. Culture resides in ideas and civilization spurns out of ideas. So it is quite easy to see the pre-occurrence of culture vis-à-vis civilization. But such a concomitance is not that easy as once civilization is formed it tends to affect the ideas or the culture which is the substrate of its very own self. The advancement of civilization affects culture in many ways. And the very common notion is that the advancement of civilization declines culture. But to analyze the statement one needs to understand what does the “word” decline mean here.

The decline means as the usual lessening of importance given on culture. But it also means that the earlier cultural axioms which have been adopted without question by all come under the hammer of reason. And all such preconditions about a culture which are rooted in irrationality are increasingly given up. For example with the spread of awareness and knowledge among the mass, the traditions like “sati” etc are given up. But this cannot be called as a decline of culture because it is a constructive effort to eradicate a social evil from society.

So when one tries to establish a concomitance between civilization

and decline of culture one needs to have a thin line approach, where one needs to separate the constructive and beneficial changes in culture and the decline of culture. One needs to see what is implied by the advancement of culture.

The very phrase “advancement of culture” refers to a dynamic process; a change. Why on earth there is a change in civilization. There is a change from one state of affair to the other when 1. The preceding state of affair has some contradictions inherent in it or 2. When there is a better or new way of doing things which are superior to those in the preceding state of affair. Both of these above reasons refer to two different epistemological paradigms but what connects the both is the thread of rationality or objectivity which in common parlance called as scientific understanding.

Civilization, as  Featured Featured stated earlier  Decline the PlacesPlaces material developments of human beings, civilization advances. And when civilization advances rationality creeps into society and culture come under the hammer of scientific inquiry. So the irrational elements of culture are progressively shed off and hence the hold of

 

Auckland featured in international design magazine

Seattle-primarily based structure and design magazine ARCADE capabilities the layout-led transformation of Auckland’s public areas in its cutting-edge difficulty.

“A City of Love: Auckland’s Visions of a Public Realm” describes

featured

 

Tāmaki Makaurau as “an exemplary with instructions to share”, and praises Auckland’s “comprehensive, included, and visionary” method to growing a metropolis that people can love.

Read the total ARCADE magazine function “A City to Love: Auckland’s Visions of a Public Realm”

What other towns can analyze from Auckland

Like other cities around the arena, Auckland is experiencing rapid boom this is inflicting strain on transportation, housing, public services and liveability.

This is a love tale – a tale about a metropolis and region remaking itself with the purpose of being a place that its residents will love, a tale about a speak between a metropolis and the folks that live there.

Auckland’s design-led method to metropolis planning and our focus on creating a metropolis that human beings can love have been singled out by means of the file’s authors as classes for different towns.

In addition, Auckland’s integrated transportation community, the revitalization of Wynyard Quarter, and our shared areas and laneways were highlighted as examples of a way to create a colorful and resilient city.

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

In the preface to One Hundred and One Famous Poems, published in 1929, editor Roy W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age.

While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen

synonym for the word featured

another word for physical feature

feature verb synonym

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

Poetry is relevant in today’s text-messaging high-tech world,

international

 

 

as evidenced by all the poetry Web sites. It speaks of love, as in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnets. It relates eternal epic truths, as in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. It captures the cry of a generation, as in Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” It reflects, as in Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. It makes a cinematic statement about freedom behind bars, as in the movie “Slam.” It speaks of the Divine, as in the poetry of Thich Nhat Hanh. I agree with Carolyn Howard-Johnson that poetry moves us–or it must if we want to move others. Howard-Johnson’s poetry moved Compulsive Reader editor Magdalena Ball to name Tracings to The Compulsive Reader list of “Top Ten Reads of 2005.”

Howard-Johnson pokes fun at portraits of poets on poetry magazines, but clearly, loves poetry:

“So long before you took up a pen, wrote pictures,
you imagined them in liquid blue, the stories of others,
your own.”

It’s easy to get caught up in our own stories without understanding them. Howard-Johnson peppers her poetry with images of travel, not just global but time travel. She remarks in “Poetry, Quantum Mechanics, and Other Trifles” that her critique group warns her she complicates her poems with too many layers:

“my ingredients, they say, are concealed
behind an opaque pottery bowl;
their matrices misunderstood.
Children we are. No one tells
us the truth of such a grand
dessert.”

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke pointed out the truths of existence in Sonnets to Orpheus, showing us that a young ballet dancer, dead, is not forever gone, but is not visible to us. That’s “the truth of such a grand/dessert.” That’s what poetry is about–revealing, evoking, describing, thought-provoking. Poetry connects the past with the present and future. Howard-Johnson can visit the historic, the war museum in Oslo, and reflect on war as it affected the world:

“Norway’s fjords shed salty international droplets featured on
faces like my father’s  magazineRound faces. Eyes dilute-blue
like the pale skies above them. Men who fought

as Churchill’s voice crackled through smuggled vacuum
tubes.”

Howard-Johnson considers war as it now affects her family:

“Only days before
I reached this spur, I saw my grandson off to war, alone. 

magazine

A sacrifice. A trade. For my father, who never marched.”

We feel the sense of place in poetry, but the place is fluid, as in Howard-Johnson’s work–a flight from LAX to Salt Lake City can take her through her own childhood home where her mother washed a slip every night. The unities of time and place in good drama or in a short story can be tweaked in poetry–although often the poet, like a painter, wants to concentrate attention on one time, one place, one concept. Good poetry can tell a story or capture a mood both ways.

Dr. James Ragan, the director of the University of Southern California Master of Professional Writing Program where I graduated in 1999, says in an interview quoted on the Master of Professional Writing Web site:

“You want to challenge yourself. Ask yourself, is my time here going to have the meaning I need for it to have? Poetry has given me that meaning. But then I had to write on the level that allowed me to cross borders as well as time, and that’s the challenge of creation.”

Ragan, like Howard-Johnson, strives for universal themes. The personal and the universal are not mutually exclusive. A poem may be peppered with personal details, but may capture a common history (World War II), the need for tolerance (a favorite theme in Howard-Johnson’s work), aging, the fear that a poet has started too late in life, which Howard-Johnson captures in “A Reel Left Running”:

“Now age obscures images, pulled taffy,
whisked meringue, they melt, struggle to be named.

So much there is to say, your craft left idle for years,
tools lay fallow, and now, now there is so little time.”

 

Who was Henry Gadsden? Merck & Company chief featured on BBC Two

PHARMACEUTICAL large Henry Gadsden is credited with changing the manner tablets are prescribed and bought around the arena.

A new documentary revealing the maximum influential humans you’ve got by no means heard of will see reporter Jacques Peretti discover the impact of his work.

Reporter Jacques Peretti (pictured) will investigate the effect of Henry

Company

 

 

Gadsden’s visionBBC
1
Reporter Jacques Peretti (pictured) will check out the effect of Henry Gadsden’s vision
Who is Henry Gadsden?

Henry Gadsden was the CEO of pharmaceutical giant Merck & Company between 1965 and 1975.

Mr. Gadsden, a Yale University graduate, oversaw a period of massive growth for the corporation and famously referred to his desire to sell capsules to wholesome human beings to amplify his consumer base.

In the past due 1970s, he told Fortune mag he wanted the taking of medicine to be as regular as chewing gum so the organization should “sell to absolutely everyone”.

Under Gadsden’s stewardship, the business enterprise’s sales quadrupled to $1billion.

He additionally increased spending on research and development from $32million to $125million, reviews Harvard Business School.

A former colleague who served as studies director at Merck said he have been committed to research telling him “We’d try no longer to cut back on studies because that is our future”.

Gadsden died in 1980 aged sixty-nine.

When can I watch Billion Dollar Deals? fortune 100 companies list

fortune 100 best companies

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better

 

than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

featured

in 1929, editor Roy W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age.

While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen.

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

Poetry is relevant in today’s text-messaging high-tech world, as evidenced by all the poetry Web sites. It speaks of love, as in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnets. It relates eternal epic truths, as in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. It captures the cry of a generation, as in Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” It reflects, as in Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. It makes a cinematic statement about freedom behind bars, as in the movie “Slam.” It speaks of the Divine, as in the poetry of Thich Nhat Hanh. I agree with Carolyn Howard-Johnson that poetry moves us–or it must if we want to move others. Howard-Johnson’s poetry moved Compulsive Reader editor Magdalena Ball to name Tracings to The Compulsive Reader list of “Top Ten Reads of 2005.”

Howard-Johnson pokes fun at portraits of poets on poetry magazines, but clearly, loves poetry:

“So long before you took up a pen, wrote pictures,
you imagined them in liquid blue, the stories of others,
your own.”

It’s easy to get caught up in our own stories without understanding them. Howard-Johnson peppers her poetry with images of travel, not just global but time travel. She remarks in “Poetry, Quantum Mechanics, and Other Trifles” that her critique group warns her she complicates her poems with too many layers:

“my ingredients, they say, are concealed
behind an opaque pottery bowl;
their matrices misunderstood.
Children we are. No one tells
us the truth of such a grand
dessert.”

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke pointed out the truths of existence in Sonnets

Who

 

to Orpheus, showing us that a young ballet dancer, dead, is not forever gone, but is not visible to us. That’s “the truth of such a grand/dessert.” That’s what poetry is about–revealing, evoking, describing, thought-provoking. Poetry connects the past with the present and future. Howard-Johnson can visit the historic, the war museum in Oslo, and reflect on war as it affected the world:

“Norway’s fjords shed salty droplets on
faces like my father’s. Round faces. Eyes dilute-blue
like the pale skies above them. Men who fought

as Churchill’s voice crackled through smuggled vacuum
tubes.”

Howard-Johnson considers war as it now affects her family:

“Only days before
I reached this spur, I saw my grandson off to war, alone.
A sacrifice. A trade. For my father, who never marched.”

We feel the sense of place in poetry, but the place is fluid, as in Howard-Johnson’s work–a flight from LAX to Salt Lake City can take her through her own childhood home where her mother washed a slip every night. The unities of time and place in good drama or in a short story can be tweaked in poetry–although often the poet, like a painter, wants to concentrate attention on one time, one place, one concept. Good poetry can tell a story or capture a mood both ways.

Dr. James Ragan, the director Company  of the University featured  Southern California Master  Who of Professional Writing Program where I graduated in 1999, says in an interview quoted on the Master of Professional Writing Website:

“You want to challenge yourself. Ask yourself, is my time here going to have the meaning I need for it to have? Poetry has given me that meaning. But then I had to write on the level that allowed me to cross borders as well as time, and that’s the challenge of creation.”

 

 

SNL’ Adds Three Featured Players for Season 43

Gardner is a Groundlings performer and actress whose credits encompass writing and voicing more than one roles on Crackle’s Bryan Cranston-produced animated comedy SuperMansion. She next has an assisting position inside the feature Life of the Party, written via and starring Melissa McCarthy. (McCarthy this month took domestic an Emmy for her function as Sean Spicer on SNL.) Gardner is repped through TalentWorks and Odenkirk Provissiero.

Null is a Chicago-based musical comedian and improviser hailing

Adds

 

 

from iO Chicago. His credits consist of the 2011 film The Heart: The Final Pulse. He is repped by UTA.

 

Additionally, SNL has additionally delivered several new writers for the approaching season, including Sam Jay (Take My Wife), Gary Richardson (The Characters), Erik Marino (Weeds), Andrew Dismukes (Call Me Brother), Steven Castillo (Becoming Red), Claire Friedman and Nimesh Patel (the 2017 White House Correspondents Dinner).

SNL returns for its forty-third season this Saturday with host Ryan Gosling and musical guest Jay-Z. The Lorne Michaels-produced sketch collection will retain to hold its national live telecasts all through the imminent season. Emmy winner Alec Stanley Baldwin is about to return inside the most suitable as President Donald Trump.

SNL capped a banner season forty-two via taking home a main nine Emmy wins this yr, consisting of for cartoon series and cast member Kate McKinnon in addition to McCarthy and 1st earl Baldwin of Bewdley.

“Going into the season, I knew I desired to get it right. We notion it’d be the largest election of our lifetime and we desired to be in the middle of it,” Michaels advised The Hollywood Reporter after SNL’s large Emmy displaying. “We lived week to week, and it changed into one of those years wherein the cast simply rose to any assignment; the writing group of workers did, and the layout team did. No one stated, ‘We’ve handiest were given two hours.’ The president just did this and we have to trade it …. This is a set that changed into united and all of 1 mind and each person sacrificed and supported every other. That’s great you ever get whilst you do the form of display like this.”

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

In the preface to One Hundred and One Famous Poems, published in 1929, editor Roy W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age.

While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen.

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

Poetry is relevant in today’s text-messaging high-tech world, as evidenced

Featured

 

 

 

by all the poetry Web sites. It speaks of love, as in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnets. It relates eternal epic truths, as in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. It captures the cry of a generation, as in Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” It reflects, as in Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. It makes a cinematic statement about freedom behind bars, as in the movie “Slam.” It speaks of the Divine, as in the poetry of Thich Nhat Hanh. I agree with Carolyn Howard-Johnson that poetry moves us–or it must if we want to move others. Howard-Johnson’s poetry moved Compulsive Reader editor Magdalena Ball to name Tracings to The Compulsive Reader list of “Top Ten Reads of 2005.”

Howard-Johnson pokes fun at portraits of poets on poetry magazines, but clearly, loves poetry:

“So long before you took up a pen, wrote pictures,
you imagined them in liquid blue, the stories of others,
your own.”

It’s easy to get caught up in our own stories without understanding them. Howard-Johnson peppers her poetry with images of travel, not just global but time travel. She remarks in “Poetry, Quantum Mechanics, and Other Trifles” that her critique group warns her she complicates her poems with too many layers:

“my ingredients, they Players say, are  Featured concealed
behind an Adds  opaque pottery bowl;
their matrices misunderstood.
Children we are. No one tells
us the truth of such a grand
dessert.”

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke pointed out the truths of existence

Adds

 

in Sonnets to Orpheus, showing us that a young ballet dancer, dead, is not forever gone, but is not visible to us. That’s “the truth of such a grand/dessert.” That’s what poetry is about–revealing, evoking, describing, thought-provoking. Poetry connects the past with the present and future. Howard-Johnson can visit the historic, the war museum in Oslo, and reflect on war as it affected the world:

“Norway’s fjords shed salty droplets on
faces like my father’s. Round faces. Eyes dilute-blue
like the pale skies above them. Men who fought

as Churchill’s voice crackled through smuggled vacuum
tubes.”

Howard-Johnson considers war as it now affects her family:

“Only days before
I reached this spur, I saw my grandson off to war, alone.
A sacrifice. A trade. For my father, who never marched.”

We feel the sense of place in poetry, but place is fluid, as in Howard-Johnson’s work–a flight from LAX to Salt Lake City can take her through her own

 

Saturday Night Live Adds 3 New Featured Players

After solid contributors Bobby Moynihan, Vanessa Bayer, and Sasheer Zamata left Saturday Night Live final season, the comic strip display has crammed their spots with 3 new featured gamers: Chris Redd, Heidi Gardner, and Luke Null.

You would possibly recollect Chris Redd, a stand-up comic,

Players

 

 

as the rebellious younger rapper Hunter the Hungry from Popstar: Never Stop Never Stopping who perhaps, or maybe did now not, or maybe did, make Connor’s penis disappear on stage.

 

Heidi Gardner, a Groundlings performer, has an upcoming function in Melissa McCarthy’s new film Life of the Party and has written for Bryan Cranston’s animated display SuperMansion. And Luke Null is a comedian from Chicago who has exactly one film credit score and performs musical comedy, admittedly my least favored form of comedy.

In addition to

In the Red Engine Press January 2006 newsletter, “Yarn spinners and Wordweavers,” Carolyn Howard-Johnson, author of Tracings, writes:

“Auden thought the purpose of poetry is to disenchant. That, my reader, may be why I am not much for rhyme or pretty, though I do like food images, especially sweets. I prefer melancholy, wistful and if a song is sung, let it discord to keep the reader alert make him reconsider. Nursery rhymes are for nurseries, sunsets to be viewed firsthand from a bluff, preferably while holding hands with someone handsome. The tendons of the best poetry are politics, introspection, and the abominable snowmen among us tempered–occasionally–by a look back at where we’ve been. Oh, and irony. That’s better than tiramisu and latté for keeping people talking late into the night.”

In the preface to One Hundred and One Famous Poems, published in 1929, editor Roy W. Cook talks about the great need for poetry in a modern industrial age.

While the modern age, with podcasting and blogs, has made poetry more accessible, poetry is also considered frivolous–and certainly not lucrative. It’s a shame because Carolyn Howard-Johnson’s poetry can make an air raid sound still and hushed. She can let us stand beside an uncle who smells of Barbasol and is on his way to war. The subtle message is clear: Stop. Pay attention. Listen.

Most of us wrote poetry in high school that included protests against parents, petitions to teenage crushes, or the usual “my life stinks, what’s the meaning of it all” poems. As adults, we may dribble our wine-and-cappuccino-soaked angst onto the page. As private therapy, poetry often can’t be beaten, and it certainly helped poet Dessa Byrd Reed heal after a car accident. But Reed turned her recovery writings into a passion for poetry that took her to China recently.

Poetry is relevant in today’s text-messaging high-tech world, as evidenced by all the poetry Web sites. It speaks of love, as in Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s sonnets. It relates eternal epic truths, as in John Milton’s Paradise Lost. It captures the cry of a generation, as in Allen Ginsberg’s “Howl.” It reflects, as in Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass. It makes a cinematic statement about freedom behind bars, as in the movie “Slam.” It speaks of the Divine, as in the poetry of Thich Nhat Hanh. I agree with Carolyn Howard-Johnson that poetry moves us–or it must if we want to move others. Howard-Johnson’s poetry moved Compulsive Reader editor Magdalena Ball to name Tracings to The Compulsive Reader list of “Top Ten Reads of 2005.”

Howard-Johnson pokes fun at portraits of poets on poetry magazines, but clearly, loves poetry:

“So long before you took up a pen, wrote pictures, 

Featured

you imagined them in liquid blue, the stories of others,
your own.”

It’s easy to get caught up in our own stories without understanding them. Howard-Johnson peppers her poetry with images of travel, not just global but time travel. She remarks in “Poetry, Quantum Mechanics, and Other Trifles” that her critique group warns her she complicates her poems with too many layers:

“my ingredients, they say, are concealed
behind an opaque pottery bowl;
their matrices misunderstood.
Children we are. No one tells
us the truth of such a grand
dessert.”

The poet Rainer Maria Rilke pointed out the truths of existence in Sonnets to Orpheus, showing us that a young ballet dancer, dead, is not forever gone, but is not visible to us. That’s “the truth of such a grand/dessert.” That’s what poetry is about–revealing, evoking, describing, thought-provoking. Poetry connects the past with the present and future. Howard-Johnson can visit the historic, the war museum in Oslo, and reflect on war as it affected the world:

“Norway’s fjords shed salty droplets on
faces like my father’s. Round faces. Eyes dilute-blue
like the pale skies above them. Men who fought

as Churchill’s  Featured voice crackled through Night Players smuggled vacuum
tubes.”

Howard-Johnson considers war as it now affects her family:

“Only days before
I reached this spur, I saw my grandson off to war, alone.
A sacrifice. A trade. For my father, who never marched.”

We feel the sense of place in poetry, but the place is fluid, as in Howard-Johnson’s work–a flight from LAX to Salt Lake City can take her through her own childhood home where her mother washed a slip every night. The unities of time and place in good drama or in a short story can be tweaked in poetry–although often the poet, like a painter, wants to concentrate attention on one time, one place, one concept. Good poetry can tell a story or capture a mood both ways.

Dr. James Ragan, the director of the University of Southern California

Night

 

 

of Professional Writing Program where I graduated in 1999, says in an interview quoted on the Master of Professional Writing Web site:

“You want to challenge yourself. Ask yourself, is my time here going to have the meaning I need for it to have? Poetry has given me that meaning. But then I had to write on the level that allowed me to cross borders as well as time, and that’s the challenge of creation.”

Ragan, like Howard-Johnson, strives for universal themes. The personal and the universal are not mutually exclusive. A poem may be peppered with personal details, but may capture a common history (World War II), the need for tolerance (a favorite theme in Howard-Johnson’s work), aging, the fear that a poet has started too late in life, which Howard-Johnson captures in “A Reel Left Running”:

“Now age obscures images, pulled taffy,
whisked meringue, they melt, struggle to be named.

So much there is to say, your craft left idle for years,
tools lay fallow, and now, now there is so little time.”